Quicklinks

Cinema Studies Undergraduate Courses

Courses in the curriculum of the Cinema Studies Institute encourage a thorough examination of the cinema, as students receive a grounding in film study in its aesthetic, technological, economic, and sociocultural dimensions. Core courses focus on film analysis and the integration of film history and theory. Advanced courses allow for more in-depth examination of particular topics, ranging from specific filmmakers and genres to how cinema engages with different cultures, spectators, and nation-states.

Cinema Studies courses (Groups A through F) offered in the 2016-2017 academic year are listed below with a link to their timetable information. For a complete course list, including those not being offered in 2016-2017, please refer to the Faculty of Arts & Science Calendar and look for 'Cinema Studies Institute' under 'Programs and Courses'.

Cross-Listed courses: (Group G) offered in 2016-2017 can also be found below. Consult the respective department for days, times and locations.

Where applicable, prerequisites and restrictions are listed after each course description.

 

2017 Summer Session

Summer course enrolment begins April 6, 2017.
Y courses: May 15 - August 14
F courses: May 15 - June 23
F exam period: June 26 - 30
S courses: July 4 - August 14
Y/S exam period: August 15-18

Please check the Faculty of Arts & Science for further information.

 

CIN105Y1-Y - Introduction to Film Study

Introduction to film analysis; concepts of film style and narrative. Topics include: documentary, avant-garde, genres, authorship, ideology, and representation.

Instructor: Benjamin Wright
Day & Time: Monday and Wednesday, 12pm - 4pm
Location: Media Commons Theatre

Group A: Foundations
Exclusion: INI115Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN240H1-F - The Crime Film

This course covers the representation of crime and criminal justice in visual media, with an emphasis on popular feature films across historical decades and national contexts of production. As a site of social, moral, and political conflict, the “crime film” has been both categorically elastic and fundamentally enduring on a global scale. Taking crime movies as cultural portals, this class will examine how this cluster of film cycles -- gangster, cop, prison, etc. -- cohere to interrogate changing notions not only of crime, criminology, and criminal justice, but also assumptions of film genre and nationality.

Instructor: TBA
Day & Time: Tuesday and Thursday, 12pm - 4 pm
Location: IN-222

Group C: Social and Cultural Practices
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 3. Society and its Institutions

 

CIN260H1-S - Framing the Real: Reality TV and Documentary Cinema

This course examines the contemporary format of reality television while engaging with its antecedents in documentary cinema. It explores how different movements and moments in each genre has laid claim to authenticity, and tracks the resulting understandings of ‘the real’ over time. Questions explored include the aesthetics of the real, celebrity and performance, and how both genres have served as platforms for queer and minoritarian voices.

Instructor: TBA
Day & Time: Wednesday and Friday, 12pm - 4pm
Location: IN-222

Group D: Theory and Criticism
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN340H1-S - Wilderness in the Cinema

This course will examine the division between nature and culture as it is represented in the cinema. Wilderness, broadly defined, is any place where nature overpowers or excludes culture, instinct trumps rationality, the unknown prevails over science and technology. This course will seek to trouble this definition of wilderness through the analysis of films about frontiers (in the old west and space, for example), indigenous perspectives on colonialism, the urban jungle, and non-anthropocentric ways of being.

Instructor: TBA
Day & Time: Tuesday and Thursday, 12pm - 4pm
Location: IN-222

Group C: Social and Cultural Practices
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations
 

CIN378Y0-Y - Aspects of a National Cinema: Britain

To register, please see the Summer Abroad program.

This course offers a critical study of British film cultures, with an emphasis on British film genres, movements and cycles from the 1960s to the present day. Although earlier representative works, to include the British documentary movement, will provide a foundational base for a comparative study of contemporary British cinema. Major as well as minor film cultures will be studied in their institutional, social, and cultural contexts to include: the long standing tradition of British realism; the Free Cinema Movement; the “New Wave;” “Swinging London;” “Thatcherite” cinema, including its heritage, art cinema, Brit-grit and Black British iterations; in addition to the recent “lad boy” underclass cycle that reconfigures the traditional conceptualization of British cinema as strictly oppositional “realism or tinsel.” Debates pertinent to the way in which British films relate to a shifting sense of national identity, towards examining the “Englishness” of British national cinema, will be highlighted.

Instructor: Kass Banning
Group E: History and Nation
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN380H1-F - Mobility and Migration in Moving Image Media

This course will explore geopolitical borderlands of moving image media that foreground mobility and migration. Through formal and conceptual approaches, we will investigate how various media articulate and politicize borders, and how bodies negotiate and mobilize these spaces in distinct ways. We will draw upon media texts that represent diverse methods of imagining these interstitial zones, ranging from classical Hollywood cinema, art cinema, experimental and essay films, television series, and media activism.

Instructor: TBA
Day & Time: Monday and Wednesday, 5pm - 9pm
Location: IN-222

Group E: History and Nation
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

2016 -2017 Fall - Winter Session

Group A Courses: Foundations
 

CIN105Y1-Y - Introduction to Film Study

Introduction to film analysis; concepts of film style and narrative. Topics include: documentary, avant-garde, genres, authorship, ideology, and representation.

Exclusion: INI115Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN201Y1-Y - Film Cultures I: Art and Industry

Examines the practices, theories, and debates surrounding the emergence of cinema through to the development of studio system filmmaking in the first half of the 20th Century. Topics include: film's relation to the other arts, formalist and realist traditions, technological innovations, audiences and reception, and cultural industries.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: INI212Y1, INI215Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

 

CIN301Y1-Y - Film Cultures II: Politics and Global Media

Examines film theory and practice from the 1950s onward, and the impact of media change on earlier film cultures and aesthetics. Topics include: New Wave cinemas, the politicization of theory, spectatorship, counter-cinemas, transnational film and “Global Hollywood”, and media theory from the analog to the digital.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1
Exclusion: INI214Y1, INI314Y1, INI315Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

 
Group B Courses: Genre and Modes
 

CIN210H1-S - Horror Film

Horror film as a genre, focusing on three types of international horror: the un-dead, body horror, and the supernatural. The genre's popular appeal, affective power, unique means of producing pleasure, and current global resurgence will be emphasized. Topics include: the aesthetics of gore and violence, technologies of fear, J-Horror, new French extremity, cult fandom and paracinema, and media convergence.

Exclusion: INI226H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN212H1-F - Cinema and Sensation I: Action/Spectacle

Action movies cement the dominance of commercial cinema, and they largely define the contemporary era of the blockbuster and CGI effects. This course examines the narrative modes and the extremes that action scenes reach, and it explores the commercial and social function of the genre. The course also traces Action's historic reach and global diversity to include its significant precursors and transnational forms that Action cinema takes on.

Exclusion: INI222H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN213H1-S - Cinema and Sensation II: Sex

While examining the history of censorship, medium specificity, sex education, and the proliferation of pornography on the Internet, this course takes sex – and its contextual frameworks – as its through-line of study. A variety of moving-image and written texts will interrogate specific processes of visual-sexual-representation, to include examining historical and aesthetic moments. Organizing topics include: identity construction, the body, sexuality, activism, pleasure, race, labour, misogyny, violence, fantasy and desire.

Exclusion: INI223H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN312Y1-Y - Documentary Film

Critical and historical survey of documentary practice, including cinema verité, ethnographic experiments, and various hybrid forms, with emphasis on the rhetorical, aesthetic, and political dimensions of the "art of record." Topics include: the filmmaker/subject/audience nexus; historiography, hagiography, and performance; and how emerging technology and new media platforms, evinced in the rise of documentary-based webdocs, i-docs, and webgames, affect the actual production and style of linear documentary, as well as impact earlier models of documentary exhibition, distribution, and viewer engagement alike.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: INI325Y1
Recommended Preparation: CIN201Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 3. Society and its Institutions

 

CIN410H1-F - Advanced Study in Genre and Modes: The “End” in Cinema

This course is a seminar-based study of endings in narrative films, in two senses: the first, the formal operations of narrative closure; the second, modern and post-modern themes of apocalypse expressed in popular, avant-garde and art cinema films. Emphasis on contemporary films. Students will select some of the films, research them and lead sessions analyzing them.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1/INI214Y1/ INI314Y1/ INI315Y1/ or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group C: Social and Cultural Practices
 

CIN330Y1-Y - Feminist Approaches to Cinema

Gender politics of feminist film culture since the 1970s. Topics include: apparatus theory and its legacy, models of spectatorship, feminist historiography, the cinematic (re)production of identity, the relationship between social movements and cinema, "postfeminism".

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1/ permission of instructor
Exclusion: INI323Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

 

CIN334H1-F - The Origins of the Animation Industry, 1900-1950: A Technosocial History

An introduction to early animation, considering its vaudeville roots, industrialization, emerging aesthetics, and representational tropes. Examination of the early corpus of animation from 1900-1950, and in-depth study of the artistic, social, and cultural milieux from which animation derived.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1
Exclusion: INI383H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN340H1-F - Special Topics in Cinema as Social and Cultural Practice: SerialIty

This course endeavours to survey serial practice in American, Canadian, and International film and related media, from the mammoth success of the silent-era serial queen melodramas, to the solidification of the film serial form as a children’s genre in the 30s and 40s and the arrival of television, to the more recent revival of serialized narratives in transmedia franchising, cable television, and the digital.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN340H1-S - Special Topics in Cinema as Social and Cultural Practice: (New) Media Aesthetics

This course investigates the theory and history of media technologies as sites of aesthetic investment in a broad variety of artistic practices. While our primary task will to understand contemporary digital media art, we pursue this goal both through critical approaches to the digital artworks themselves as well as a consideration of the histories of aesthetic practice that inform them. That means, on the one hand, addressing ourselves to the history of “old” media practices of particular importance to contemporary media art—avant-garde music, experimental film, mainframe art, early computer animation, video art, and installation art. We will consider works by John Cage, Tony Conrad, Alvin Lucier, Andy Warhol, Marina Abramović, and Felix Gonzales-Torres, among others. On the other, it means using these histories to mount a sustained investigation of contemporary digital art practices that include media installation art, tactical media, net.art, and indie and experimental games, including works by John Simon, Thompson & Craighead, Frances Stark, Anna Anthropy, Ryan Trecartin, and others.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN349H1-Y - Screenwriting

Students will develop screenwriting skills under the guidance of a renowned screenwriter-in-residence through a combination of writing workshops and individual consultations. Like the course, the appointment of the Universal Screenwriter-in-Residence occurs biannually.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, and two additional Cinema Studies full-course equivalents
Balloting required; deadline for submission of ballot: April 30, 2016.
Exclusion:
INI388H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN430H1-S - Advanced Study in Cinema as Social and Cultural Practice: Bond, James Bond

You know his name — but do you know the history of this global film franchise? This seminar will explore the legacy, longevity, and global phenomenon of the James Bond franchise by exploring a number of historical and conceptual issues, including literary adaptation strategies, international co-productions, cultural appropriation, narrative and style, star personas, gender, and ideology.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1/INI214Y1/ INI314Y1/ INI315Y1/ or permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN431H1-S - Advanced Study in Cinema as Social and Cultural Practice: Graphic!

This course will examine the relationship between cartooning in newspapers, magazines, and pulp publications and contemporary changes in animated cinematic media. It will begin with the earliest animators, such as Winsor McCay and John R. Bray, and their relationship to performative cartooning and to newspaper and magazine illustration. It will also examine the rise of pulp superhero and continuing-character comics in the 1930s and 1940s (such as Superman or Donald Duck), their expression in animation and in B-movie serials and one-offs, and their connection to the emerging medium of television. The class will explore the rise of underground comics in the 1960s and 1970s in relation to alternative cultural and political movements, and relating to changes to cinematic practice brought on by the collapse of the Production Code and rise of alternative cinemas. Finally, it will consider graphic novels and manga alongside the rise of digital animation practices and live cinema in the twenty-first century. The course will expose students to key texts in the history of cartooning and animation, including Bukatman, McLeod, and Klein, as well as newer scholarly work by such as Crafton, Leslie, Buchan, Beaty, and LaMarre.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1/INI214Y1/ INI314Y1/ INI315Y1/ or permission of instructor
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group D Courses: Theory and Criticism
 

CIN260H1-F - Selected Topics in Cinema Studies: “New Media"

From YouTube videos and animated GIFs to the immersive worlds of video games and digital 3D films, new media have altered our relationship to moving images. This course will examine the transformations of moving images brought about by the emergence of computer-based visual culture. Students will learn key concepts in new media studies through varied examples, from early hypermedia and virtual reality to digital cinema, video games, crowdsourced entertainment, and viral video culture. Course readings will build upon and expand existing models of analysis from film, media, and cultural studies. Assignments will develop students’ skills to analyze new media as visual, textual, and interactive objects; as technologies and the products of socio-historical forces; and as a transdisciplinary field of knowledge.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN353H1-S - Issues in Film Authorship II

Advanced study of issues in film authorship through intensive examination of one or more major filmmakers.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: INI375H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN360H1-S - Special Topics in Theory and Criticism: Media, Technology, Control

This course is dedicated to asking the question: How do contemporary media function as technologies of control? The goal of the course will not be to arrive at an answer, but rather to learn how to ask this question well. In particular, each of these terms—media, technology, and control—will be the target of substantial critical and theoretical elaboration. We will take Michel Foucault’s later writing on discipline, control, and power as an organizing frame to ask what sorts of political effects media technologies can have, and what possibilities they might offer for resistance.

We will focus our inquiry by attending, in turn, to three sites in which digital media technologies have provoked political anxiety, and which Foucault helps us think about: surveillance, sexuality, and financialization. Each of these will form a unit of the course, and in each, we will read relevant sections from Foucault’s body of work and attend to media practices and objects that help us ask better questions. These media will include films (Strange Days, My Life on Ice, The Big Short), politically engaged art (The Yes Men), political activism (#blacklivesmatter, Occupy), and what we might call ordinary media (casual gaming, dating and hookup apps, social media). In addition to Foucault, we will also read from the substantial critical literature that extends his ways of thought, including thinkers such as Gilles Deleuze, Friedrich Kittler, Maurizio Lazzarato, Wendy Brown, Alexander Galloway, Lisa Nakamura, Seb Franklin, and others.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

 

CIN369H1-F - Critical Writing on Film

The practice of film criticism: studies of examples of journalistic and scholarly critical writing, practical sessions of process writing, and collaborative editing. Course includes regular film screenings.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1 and one additional Cinema Studies full-course equivalent/ permission of the instructor
Balloting required; deadline for submission of ballot: April 30, 2016

Exclusion: INI384H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN450H1-F - Advanced Study in Theory and Criticism: Feelings and Networks

It has become commonplace to say that, increasingly, and because of our new networked media, we are all connected. It is equally common to lament an increasing alienation caused by these same media: despite our increasing connectedness, we are ever more isolated in this era of social networks and geo-located networking apps. Meanwhile, Facebook’s recent experiments in the “emotional manipulation” of its users has the object of much (overwrought) public outcry. Against this backdrop, this course asks what it feels like to be networked, how the network feels, and how feelings themselves become network phenomena. Nobody really knows yet what to make of the network, our presence in it, its presence in our lives. To learn how to ask these questions, we will turn to a number of scenes of analysis, both empirical and aesthetic. Some of these will be empirical scenes of encounter, of confusion, of not-yet-knowing, of anxiety: online dating and hookup apps, “sharing” and oversharing, financialization and algorithmic trading, search engines. In addition to these empirical scenes, we will study their aesthetic mediation in digital media art (My Best Thing, Beacon), in films (Citizenfour, Her, Gamer, Blackhat), novels and memoirs (Super Sad True Love Story, Times Square Red/Times Square Blue, Pattern Recognition), and videogames (Journey). To help us think about networks, we will turn to media theory, both old and new (Marshall McLuhan, Alexander Galloway, Patrick Jagoda, Nicole Starosielski), add well as theorists concerned instead with feelings, affect, feminism, and queer theory (Lauren Berlant, Leo Bersani, Brian Massumi, Tim Dean).

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1/INI214Y1/ INI314Y1/ INI315Y1/ or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN452H1-S - Advanced Study in Theory and Criticism: Expanded Cinema: Moving Images in the Gallery

Conceptualizing cinema beyond single-screen projection entails study of how video installation’s temporal and affective affordances—to include sensory haptic encounters within the unique temporality of gallery space ­–affords unique forms of engagement. This seminar therefore will explore the recent proliferation of moving images in museum and art gallery space as an aesthetic and cultural practice. We will examine installation’s capacity to provoke interpretive possibilities and associations within the projected and constructed space of the gallery through a number of generative frameworks: filmic, philosophical, and art historical. To this end, we will study installation’s precedents, such as the essay film, which some claim can be understood as a form of thought itself. Lastly, through numerous case studies, we will explore how the proliferation of moving images in the gallery is in conversation with the “documentary turn” in contemporary art. Field trips to local exhibitions throughout the term will complement in-class study of documented works and films

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1/INI214Y1/ INI314Y1/ INI315Y1/ or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group E Courses: History and Nation
 

CIN374Y1-Y - American Filmmaking in the Studio Era

Industrial, economic, ideological, and aesthetic dimensions of the American studio era.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: INI324Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 3. Society and its Institutions

 

CIN376Y1-Y - Chinese Cinemas

Examination of Chinese films in their three post-World War II production centres: The People's Republic of China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Commercial, political, and aesthetic trends; international reception; major auteurs and genres. Directors include Tsui Hark, Chen Kaige, Zang Yimou, Edward Yang, John Woo, and Wong Kar-Wai.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: INI390Y1
Recommended Preparation: CIN201Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 3. Society and its Institutions

 

CIN378H1-F - Aspects of a National Cinema: The Other Europe

This course examines the cinema of Eastern Europe, to include a study of its evolving filmmaking traditions and practices, distinct cultural contexts, revered auteurs, and innovative ‘New Waves’.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN470H1-F - Advanced Study in History and Nation: Time and the Human Condition

According to sociologist George Simmel, modern life requires that individuals conceive of their lives as organized according to an “impersonal time schedule” (1903) that replaced the circadian rhythms and chronobiological processes of agriculture-based societies. This epochal shift is accompanied by the rise of cinema, arguably the time-based medium that is most synonymous with modernity. In the late twentieth century this shift was exacerbated by the advent of personal computing; as a result, screens (from the cinema to the iPad) have become the privileged site for social interactions: as Paul Virilio noted, “The screen has become the city square” (1997), replacing live assemblies of personal, mercantile, juridical, and even religious nature. Through an examination of a variety of visual media, including painting, still photography, cinema, and internet art, this course explores how what Mary Ann Doane described as the “emergence of cinematic time” (2002) has affected our perception of the human condition.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1/INI214Y1/ INI314Y1/ INI315Y1/ or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group F Courses: Independent Studies
 

 

CIN490Y1-Y - Independent Studies in Cinema

See course description for CIN492H1 listed below. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1/INI214Y1/ INI314Y1/ INI315Y1/ or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN491H1-F - Independent Studies in Cinema

See course description for CIN492H1 listed below. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1/INI214Y1/ INI314Y1/ INI315Y1/ or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN492H1-S - Independent Studies in Cinema

Independent research projects devised by students and supervised by Cinema Studies faculty. Open to advanced Specialist and Major students in the Program.Submit applications to the Undergraduate Program Office: Fall 2016 courses, May 1/Winter 2017 courses, November 1/ Summer 2017 courses, April 1. See Forms for application form. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1/INI214Y1/ INI314Y1/ INI315Y1/ or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 
Group G Courses: Cross-Listed
 

HIS335H1-F - Soviet Cultural History

This course will explore Russian culture – art, architecture, film, and literature – from 1917 to the collapse of the USSR. Readings and screenings will trace the main developments of Soviet cultural history, from the Russian Avant-Garde and proletarian culture to socialist realism, and from Khrushchev’s “thaw” to Soviet village and urban prose of the 1960s and an example of Soviet postmodernism.

Prerequisite: HIS250Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

HIS460H1-S - Soviet History and Film: 1941-1991

This course explores Soviet film as a historical source and the institutional and ideological history of Soviet film production, distribution, and exhibition from World War II to the disintegration of the Soviet Union. The course is aimed at students who have a background in Russian history or film studies and wish to develop their knowledge in either area or experiment with interdisciplinary approaches.

Prerequisite: INI115Y1/HIS250Y1/335H1
Exclusion: HIS450Y1/SLA233H1/SLA234H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

HIS467H1-F - French Colonial Indochina: Cultures, Texts, Film

This course examines French colonial Indochina through a number of different lenses. Early attention will be afforded to the cross-cultural “contact zones” between colonial and colonized societies.  Other issues that will be stressed include contested geographies, the characteristics of a settler society, imperial cultures, expressions of colonial power, and forms of opposition and resistance.

Prerequisite: EAS204Y1/HIS104Y1/107Y1/280Y1/283Y1/315H1/388H1 or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 3. Society and its Institutions

 

ITAL240Y1 - History of Italian Cinema

This course surveys the history of Italian cinema and the sociopolitical circumstances surrounding the film industry, from its early days to the present, while also introducing the students to methods of analysis and research appropriate to the field. Emphasis will be placed on films from the silent era to the 1960s, and from the 1960s to the present. This course includes a component designed to introduce students to methods of scholarly research appropriate to the field. The course is given in English and all films shown have English subtitles.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

ITAL340H1-S - Italian Neorealist Cinema

The focus of this course is the films of Italian Neorealism, one of the most influential, artistic, and intellectual movements in the history of world cinema. While emphasis will be placed primarily on the work of Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica, and Luchino Visconti, the course will also offer a detailed discussion of the historical context and of the sociopolitical issues of postwar Italy. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience. (Given in English)

Exclusion: ITA340Y
Recommended Preparation: ITA240Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

SPA375H1 - Latin American Cinema

Latin American cinema approached within the framework of cultural studies and film theory, with attention to aesthetic and social forms, and to questions of national and cultural issues. May be focused on a particular region or period, or may be more of a representative survey, depending on instructor.

Prerequisite: SPA219Y1/SPA220Y1
Recommended Preparation: CIN105Y1/CIN201Y1/SPA258H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

SLA234H1 - Russian and Soviet Cinema

A survey of the Russian cinematic tradition from its beginnings through the first decade following the disintegration of the USSR. The course examines the avant-garde cinema and film theory of the 1920s; the totalitarian esthetics of the 1920s-1940s and the ideological uses of film art; the revolution in film theory and practice in the 1950s-1960s; cinema as medium of cultural dissent and as witness to social change. Students also acquire basic skills of film analysis. Taught in English, all films subtitled in English.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

SLA226H1 - Film and ethics: Polish Cinema

The Polish School in cinema, its predecessors and successors, their artistic accomplishments, major theoretical and thematic concerns, and their place on the map of European cinema.
Films of Ford, Wajda, Polanski, Konwicki, Borowczyk, Has, Kawalerowicz, Zanussi, Kieslowski, and of the new generation of Polish film makers. Films and discussions in English.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations