Summer Undergraduate Courses

Please check this webpage for the most up-to-date information.

Y courses run May 9 - August 30, 2022
F courses run May 9 - June 29, 2022
S courses run July 4 - August 30, 2022.

Group A: Foundations

Introduction to film analysis; concepts of film style and narrative. Topics include: documentary, avant-garde, genres, authorship, ideology, and representation.

Day and time: Tuesdays 10:00-14:00, Thursday 10:00-14:00 

Classroom: RL-3025 (Media Commons Theatre, 130 St. George St.)

Delivery Method: In Person

Instructor: Kate J. Russell

Exclusion: INI115Y1, ENGB70H3, ENGB75H3, ENGB76H3, CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 
Group B: Genre and Modes

Abstract animation can be hard to explain and seemingly about nothing. Through the use of hand-scratching, dyeing, flicker, collages, and DIY, experimental animators like Oskar Fischinger, Norman McLaren, Len Lye and Jodie Mack have used animation as a laboratory for perceiving, patterning, feeling and thinking. This course will examine why people look at weird shapes, abstract patterns and flashing colors for hours and what it tells us about media, animation, history, and our own perceptions regarding these categories.

The course is structured around three central questions: 1. What is experimental animation? How is it different from other kinds of animation and how do we draw the boundaries of it? Can experimental animation be cinema? 2.Why do we watch experimental animation films and what can experimental animation teach us about media, history, and our own perceptions? What does it tell us about the cinematic apparatus? 3. How might we conceive a history of experimental animation? Ultimately, this course argues for the importance of experimental animation in film history and fosters a love of watching them.

Day and time: Tuesday 10:00-14:00, Thursday 10:00-14:00

Classroom: IN-222 (Deluxe Screening Room, 2 Sussex Ave.)

Delivery Method: In Person

Instructor: Srijita Banerjee 

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 
Group C: Social and Cultural Practices

A lone gunslinger. A frontier town under siege. Tumbleweeds. The Western’s symbolic potency has never disappeared even as the genre’s popularity has waxed and waned since the invention of cinema; we see remnants of its iconography in television, music videos, and advertisements. CIN240H1F - The Western will explore the fraught relationship between Western films and North American history, the genre’s global popularity, and its social conscience. We will examine concepts such as mythology, nationhood, freedom, necessity, (so-called) civilization, nature, genocide, and settler colonialism within a genre that is constantly shifting in relation to its socio-political moment. This course will offer students the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the trajectory of the Western genre, get to know important critiques of it, and learn its potential for nuance and complexity.

We will also examine how Western tropes allow countries across the globe to comment on American influence. These transnational productions (e.g. Canada, Japan, Italy, South Africa) take advantage of the Western’s capacity for thinking through the consequences of America’s development as a nation to reflect on some of its troubling legacies.

Day and time: Monday 13:00-17:00, Wednesday 13:00-17:00

Classroom: IN-222 (Deluxe Screening Room, 2 Sussex Ave.)

Delivery Method: In Person

Instructor: Joshua Wiebe

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirements: 3. Society and its Institutions

From psychedelic panoramas to political thrillers, see Canada like you’ve never seen it before! Such is the promise and struggle of Canadian cinema—to represent Canada by overcoming its vast geography and the diverse local, regional, and national histories of its communities. In this course, we will explore how to think about a nation through and with film through topics, including 1) infrastructure, which will focus on the foundation of Canadian cinema institutions alongside new modes of travel, both allowing for new ways of seeing Canada. 2) Environment, which will examine aesthetic representations of the Canadian environment from coast to coast, North to South. 3) Cultural memory, which will look at how filmmakers use the medium to remediate the past, remember histories that face erasure, and imagine alternative futures. Some filmmakers include Claude Jutra, Colin Low, Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers, Mike Jones, Rhayne Vermette, Sarah Polley, and Sylvia Hamilton.

Day and time: Monday 10:00-12:00 EDT, Wednesday 10:00-12:00 EDT

Delivery Method: Online Synchronous

Delivery Instructions: Lectures are delivered online synchronously. Screenings are viewed online asynchronously. It is recommended that students have a computer with a microphone and camera in order to participate in online activities.

Instructor: Meghan Romano

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirements: 3. Society and its Institutions

This course will examine experimental/avant-garde LGBTQ+ cinema from across the US, Europe, and Canada, beginning in the 1930s until the rise of New Queer Cinema in the 1990s, which is a significant and influential movement in queer film history. Themes and topics include race, gender and sexuality, corporeality and affect, pleasure, horror and abjection, as well as myth and the occult. The course will focus on independent filmmakers whose lived experiences were often intimately tied to their work, with particular attention to recurring aspects of form like nonlinear or nonnarrative structures, associative editing, and visual abstraction, towards an understanding of queer film history and worldmaking as intertwined with formal experimentation. Some questions guiding this course include: What is the relationship between experimental cinema, queerness, and desire? How are identities and bodies reconfigured on (and off) screen? What is the role of the filmmaker in these works? What is the historical and ongoing significance of experimental art to the formation of alternative communities and subcultures? Through a sustained engagement with these questions and a wide range of media objects and texts, the aim is to foster an enriched understanding of the interplay between experimental form and affect, the development of queer worldmaking practices over time, how difference and experimental aesthetics animate one another, an extensive encounter with some key conversations and debates in queer and affect theory, and an adventurous approach to formal analysis.

Filmmakers might include: Jean Cocteau, Curtis Harrington, Kenneth Anger, Jean Genet, Jack Smith, Barbara Rubin, Fred Halsted, Wakefield Poole, Barbara Hammer, Cheryl Dunye, Lizzie Borden, Chantal Akerman, Isaac Julien, Marlon Riggs, Derek Jarman, Andy Warhol, David Wojnarowicz, Richard Fung, and Mike Hoolboom.

Day and time: Tuesday 10:00-12:00 EDT, Thursday 10:00-12:00 EDT

Delivery Method: Online Synchronous

Delivery Instructions: Lectures are delivered online synchronously. Screenings are viewed online asynchronously. It is recommended that students have a computer with a microphone and camera in order to participate in online activities.

Instructor: Julian Chamoun

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1 or 1.0 credit from SDS255H1, SDS256H1, SDS279H1, SDS355H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirements: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 
Group D: Theory and Criticism

Of the twenty-five events with the highest recorded audience numbers, twenty-four have been sporting events. Though we are deeply invested in being eyewitnesses to inspiring feats of athleticism, we often forget that thousands, millions, and even billions of viewers experience sporting events through media technologies: cinema, television, gambling applications, video games, streaming, and social media platforms. This course offers a historical, cultural, technological, and aesthetic survey of institutionalized sport, inviting students to explore how media and culture have altered and shaped, or conversely, been altered and shaped by the sporting event. How have sports, through the media lens, helped to (dis)assemble various identities - national, class-based, gendered, racial, ethnic, or abled - and how have sports-media represented, augmented, or distorted reality? This course will take a multidisciplinary approach to explore these topics in cinema, television, video games, and social media content.

Day and time: Tuesday 15:00-19:00, Thursday 15:00-19:00

Classroom: IN-222 (Deluxe Screening Room, 2 Sussex Ave.)

Delivery Method: In Person

Instructor: Daniele Iannucci

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirements: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Crossing genres from crime and melodrama to horror and science fiction, David Fincher, Karyn Kusama, and Carl Franklin have each struggled with and against the practices of mainstream and independent filmmaking across their careers. Whether encountering studio interference while helming blockbuster projects (Alien3 and Aeon Flux) or resistance after box-office disappointments (Out of Time and Jennifer’s Body), Fincher, Kusama, and Franklin demonstrate the struggles contemporary filmmakers face in asserting creative control over their work.

As we work through each of these respective filmographies, we will also be surveying historical and contemporary approaches to authorship in cinema studies and critical theory since the mid-20th century. Beginning with its origins in French and American film cultures, we will work through the auteur-structuralism debates of the late 1960s, the Barthesian death of the author, as well as a variety of more recent approaches focusing on collaboration, industrial pressures, film festivals, and film-philosophy. Guiding us will be two broad questions. First, what do we gain as scholars or as spectators through a continued focus on the authors of the films we watch? Second, how does this inform our conception of authorship more broadly, as well as our methods for studying cinema?

Day and time: Monday 17:00-21:00, Wednesday 17:00-21:00

Classroom: IN-222 (Deluxe Screening Room, 2 Sussex Ave.)

Delivery Method: In Person

Instructor: Mynt Marsellus

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1

Exclusion: INI375H1, ENGD52H3, CIN206H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirements: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 
Group E: History and Nation

This course is offered through the Summer Abroad program. Please visit their website to apply and learn more.

This course will foster deeper comprehension of Irish history and culture through the imaginative lens of contemporary Irish cinema. Following the restructuring of the Irish Film Board in 1993, the reorganization of Irish tax laws, recent co-production agreements, and a number of international cross-over box-office successes, the idea of Irish cinema has exceeded both previous definitions and stereotypical depictions. We will critically examine contemporary films and moving image art in the context of Irish culture and identity, to include such historical markers as “The Troubles,” while being attentive to both industrial and governmental structures. At the same time, complex negotiations between an Irish North American diasporic market for nostalgia films and local investment in more complex postcolonial representation will be studied. Lastly, how Irelands’ iconic landscape has been mobilized in both local and recent Hollywood blockbuster productions – the ‘selling’ of Ireland – and its effects on ecologies –both natural and industrial –will be explored, in addition to analyzing how landscape itself has fostered attempts to shape a national cinema’s self-definition, that has, in turn, cultivated film tourism.

Instructor: Kass Banning

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirements: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

With their radical experiments in film language and montage, early Soviet filmmakers -Sergei Eisenstein, Dziga Vertov, Vsevolod Pudovkin - invented a language of revolutionary cinema: a force that explodes a way of seeing humanity, struggle, history, and politics in and through cinema. In this course, we will be moving across the tumultuous 20th century, from the revolutionary avant-garde with its enthusiasm through utopian visions and terror of the Stalin era to the 1960s cultural and political revival, and eventual fatigue, boredom, and chaos preceding the collapse of the Soviet Union. We will look closely at works representatives of different national cinemas (Armenian, Belarusian, Georgian, Russian, and Ukrainian cinemas) and focus on films by Dziga Vertov, Aleksander Dovzhenko, Sergei Eisenstein, Larisa Shepitko, Michail Kalatozov, and Sergei Parajanov among others to examine the ways that the language of cinema developed across tumultuous Soviet history.

Day and time: Tuesday 17:00-21:00, Thursday 17:00-21:00

Classroom: IN-222 (Deluxe Screening Room, 2 Sussex Ave.)

Delivery Method: In Person

Instructor: Inesa Khatkovskaya

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirements: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations