Current Undergraduate Courses

Students should plan to attend in-person in September 2021. As the Dean of the Faculty of Arts & Science mentioned in her recent message to the A&S community, we will continue to provide updates as we receive them and if public health guidelines change.

First Year Foundation

Films create story worlds, imaginary environments in which characters live and act, and where events, large and small, transpire. Some story worlds are elaborate, fanciful constructs (think of Disney’s animated films). Others stay close to reality (think of “docudramas”). But across the spectrum, all of them are framed by and provided with rules of time and space, of believable or impossible. This course offers an examination of selected story worlds from several periods of film history. Emphasis falls on the expansive story worlds of contemporary corporately-run media-franchise “universes,” like the cross-media “DC Universe.”

First Year Foundation courses are restricted to first-year students, and are not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Day and time: Monday 11:00-13:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: Seminar style course to be offered in person.

Instructor: To be announced

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Group A: Foundations

Introduction to film analysis; concepts of film style and narrative. Topics include: documentary, avant-garde, genres, authorship, ideology, and representation.

Please note that students must sign up for the Practicum and a Tutorial. When the 2021/22 Timetable is released, please see Faculty of Arts & Science Timetable for Tutorial days and times.

Delivery Method: Lecture and Practicum (Screenings) are Online Asynchronous, Tutorial is Online Synchronous

Delivery Instructions: Both lectures (LEC) and screenings (PRA) are delivered online asynchronous. Tutorials (TUT) are delivered online synchronous, as per the meeting schedule. Students will be expected to watch asynchronous lecture videos and screenings prior to tutorials. It is recommended that students have a computer with a microphone and camera in order to participate in online activities.

Instructor: Corinn Columpar

Exclusion: INI115Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Emergence of cinema from its start until the dismantling of the studio system and an emergent internationalism in the early 1960s. Examines the practices and theories underlying the development of cinema as a mass medium in the 20th century.

Day and time: Tuesday 13:00-14:00, Wednesday 15:00-18:00  - Please note that students must sign up for a Tutorial. When the 2021/22 Timetable is released, please see Faculty of Arts & Science Timetable for Tutorial days and times.

Delivery MethodLecture is In Person, Tutorial is Online Synchronous

Delivery Instructions: Lectures and screenings will take place in person. Tutorials will take place online synchronously, as per the meeting schedule. It is recommended that students have a computer with a microphone and camera in order to participate in online activities.

Instructor: Charlie Keil

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1

Exclusion: INI212Y1, INI215Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

Examines film theory and practice from the 1950s onward, and the impact of media change on earlier film cultures and aesthetics.

Day and time: Tuesday 12:00-13:00, Wednesday 12:00-15:00 - Please note that students must sign up for a Tutorial. When the 2021/22 Timetable is released, please see Faculty of Arts & Science Timetable for Tutorial days and times.

Delivery Method: Lecture is In Person, Tutorial is Online Synchronous

Delivery Instructions: Both lectures and screenings are delivered in person synchronously. Tutorials are delivered online synchronously, as per the meeting schedule. It is recommended that students have a computer with a microphone and camera in order to participate in online activities.

Instructor: James Cahill

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1

Exclusion: INI214Y1, INI314Y1, INI315Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

Group B: Genre and Modes

This course is the study of science fiction films in their cultural and political contexts and the genre's narrative and conceptual components. The goal of the course is to familiarize students with science fiction films as popular genre texts, emphasizing the period between 1950 and the present.

Please note that students must sign up for a Tutorial. When the 2021/22 Timetable is released, please see Faculty of Arts & Science Timetable for Tutorial days and times.

Delivery Method: Lecture is Online Asynchronous, Tutorial is Online Synchronous

Delivery Instructions: Lectures will be delivered asynchronously online (recorded) and tutorials will be delivered synchronously online, per the meeting schedule. Screenings will be online asynchronous. It is recommended that students have a computer with a microphone and camera in order to participate in online activities.

Instructor: To be announced.

Exclusion: INI227H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Originating in the mid-19th century from journalistic accounts and detective stories, crime fiction has emerged as one of the dominant popular genres in the 20th century across a variety of media and platforms, from true crime dime novels to radio dramas, from hard-boiled literature to prestige television series. Rejuvenated in the 21st century by the consolidation of gaming culture and the rise of podcasting, crime narratives have expanded to transmediality, stretching the boundaries between fiction and documentary practices. In this context, the culturally porous and generically elastic crime film had remained one of the most enduring cinematic expressions of sociopolitical anxieties related to class, gender, race, and ethnicity. This course examines a selection of crime film traditions across various geographical areas and historical periods, investigating the resilience of this form from the silent period to the present day.

Day and time: Monday 15:00-18:00 - Please note that students must sign up for a Tutorial. When the 2021/22 Timetable is released, please see Faculty of Arts & Science Timetable for Tutorial days and times.

Delivery Method: Lecture is In Person, Tutorial is Online Synchronous

Delivery Instructions: Lectures and screenings will take place in person. Tutorials are delivered synchronously online, as per the meeting schedule. It is recommended that students have a computer with a microphone and camera in order to participate in online activities.

Instructor: To be announced.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Critical and historical survey of documentary practice, including cinema verité, ethnographic experiments, and various hybrid forms, with emphasis on the rhetorical, aesthetic, and political dimensions of the "art of record." Topics include: the filmmaker/subject/audience nexus; historiography, hagiography, and performance; and how emerging technology and new media platforms, evinced in the rise of documentary-based webdocs, i-docs, and webgames, affect the actual production and style of linear documentary, as well as impact earlier models of documentary exhibition, distribution, and viewer engagement alike.

Day and time:

  • Fall 2021: Wednesday 18:00-20:00
  • Winter 2022: Tuesday 18:00-21:00, Wednesday 18:00-20:00

Delivery Method: 

  • Fall 2021: Lecture is In Person, Screening in Online Asynchronous
  • Winter 2022: Lecture and Screening are In Person

Delivery Instructions: In the Fall 2021 term, lectures will take place in person on Wednesdays 6-8pm and screenings will be online asynchronous. In the Winter 2022 term, lectures remain the same while screenings will switch to in person on Tuesdays 6-9pm. It is recommended that students have a computer with internet access for the Fall screenings.

Instructor: To be announced.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1

Exclusion: INI325Y1

Recommended Preparation: CIN201Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 3. Society and its Institutions

Course description to come.

Day and time: Monday 18:00-20:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: Lectures will take place in person. Screenings will be online asynchronous. It is recommended that students have a computer with internet access for the screenings.

Instructor: To be announced.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

This course examines "cult" and "exploitation" cinema. It examines the growing popularity of cult/exploitation films as an emerging cinematic subculture that valorizes disreputable or "trash" cinema. A number of sub-genres within exploitation film, including teen films, educational/instructional films, sexploitation, and Blaxploitation, will be explored. The social politics of appropriating texts through ironic reading strategies will also be considered.

Day and time: Friday 12:00-16:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: Lectures and screenings will be offered in person. 

Instructor: Guy Maddin

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1

Exclusion: INI396H1F (2011), CIN320H1F (20145), CIN320H1S (2016)

Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

In a course drawing heavily upon my own personal experiences as a sui generis director of niche art films, I will invite students to explore with me the challenge of reinvention—how does one reinvent one’s career? oneself?—using my own career-at-a-crossroads as the principal case study. Giving special attention to the rapidly changing landscape of contemporary cinema and the wide variety of options available, we will screen and discuss examples of documentary fiction, essay films, camera diaries, DIY micro-budget productions, behind-the-scenes documentaries, found-footage work, film interventions, fiction/hidden-camera hybrids; and every possible combination and permutation of the above reconfigured into previously unforeseen hybrids and compound hybrids, asking what they can teach us and how they might model forms of reinvention.

Students will watch work by contemporary groundbreakers each week in screenings and spend equal time discussing, analyzing, and creatively responding to the work and ideas of this class. You will learn to produce digital film journals featuring uncomplicated edits of original footage, musical score and voice-over narration in the service of making your own short (1-4 min) cine-essays, diaries and documentaries. Students will require access to a digital camera, even if it's merely a cell phone, and iMovie or a comparably simple and inexpensive editing app.

Day and time: Monday 11:00-13:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: Seminar will be take place in person. Screenings will be online asynchronous. It is recommended that students have a computer with internet access for the screenings.

Instructor: Guy Maddin

Prerequisite:  At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, and CIN301Y1. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Group C: Social and Cultural Practices

Cinema as a commercial enterprise. Production, distribution, and exhibition in the political economy of North American film culture.

Day and time: Thursday 10:00-13:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: Lectures and screenings will take place in person. 

Instructor: To be announced

Exclusion: INI228H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities or Social Science

Breadth Requirement: 3. Society and its Institutions

1970s Hollywood filmmaking has been characterized in contradictory ways. On the one hand, it is described as an American “art cinema” of innovation and experimentation. In the work of maverick directors, the Hollywood Renaissance is said to have introduced viewers to “the pathos of failure,” anti-heroes, and a set of independent production techniques made possible by the studio system’s deterioration. On the other hand, however, critics point to the industry’s absorption by multimedia conglomerates during this period, its reliance upon big budget/blockbuster filmmaking, and its growing affiliation with advertising as evidence of Hollywood’s uninterrupted dedication to profitmaking. According to this position, little about Hollywood changed in the 1970s. CIN240H1F - The Hollywood Renaissance surveys this pivotal decade in American film history by highlighting its many innovations, while also recognizing its continuities with Hollywood’s past. We begin by examining Hollywood’s late-1960s Renaissance, the reconfiguration of its industry, and the alignment of new cinematic forms with emergent social and political perspectives. We then turn to an analysis of Hollywood filmmaking in the 1970s: its marked stylistic novelty; its revision of genre; the emphasis on directors as “auteurs” within its production culture; its decisive revitalization of the Blockbuster and “special effects” movies. We end with a discussion of the Hollywood Renaissance’s substantial influence on independent American cinema after the 1970s.

Please note that students must sign up for a Tutorial. When the 2021/22 Timetable is released, please see Faculty of Arts & Science Timetable for Tutorial days and times.

Delivery Method: Lecture is Online Asynchronous, Tutorial is Online Synchronous

Delivery Instructions: Lectures and screenings will be delivered online asynchronously (recorded) and tutorials will be delivered online synchronously per the meeting schedule. It is recommended that students have a computer with a microphone and camera in order to participate in online activities.

Instructor: To be announced.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 3. Society and its Institutions

This course examines the second fifty years of animation, first by marking Disney's shifting fortunes, then broadening the scope to take in its competitors here and abroad. The global nature of postwar animation has been an odd amalgam of competition and cooperation, of private and public funding, and of film, television, and eventually webcasting, and we will explore some of the changes the form has gone through in the past fifty years or so. Since this is a study of art and of commerce, and of high and low culture, we will view our limited history through the lenses of aesthetics, cultural practices, business decisions, and sometimes political struggle.

Day and time: Tuesday 14:00-16:00, Wednesday 15:00-17:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: Lecture and screenings will take place in person.

Instructor:  Nicholas Sammond

Prerequisite:  CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1

Exclusion: INI396H1S (2013), CIN320H1S (2014)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

This course explores the cultural, aesthetic, technological, and political category of “black cinema.” Across the diaspora black cinema is an artistic praxis that utilizes techniques like improvisation and collaboration in order to make and remake the cinematic archive. The films and filmmakers in this category intervene in cinematic histories by responding to exclusionary narratives, technologies, and critical discourse by imagining alternative stories, spaces, and temporalities. Thus, these films help articulate both the pervasiveness of anti-blackness in our visual culture and help us understand the difference (film) aesthetics can make (Chun, 2019).

Day and time: Monday 15:00-17:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: Lectures will take place in person. Screenings will be delivered online asynchronously. It is recommended that students have a computer with internet access for the online screenings.

Instructor: Lauren Cramer

Prerequisite:  CIN105Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Course description to come.

Day and time: Monday 18:00-20:00, Thursday 18:00-20:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: Lectures and screenings will take place in person.

Instructor: To be announced.

Prerequisite:  CIN105Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Over the course of the 20th and 21st centuries, a great many critics have despaired at the damage new media technologies do to our individual lives and to our collective life. The other side of this complaint is the promise of such new media technologies to offer more pleasurable, more optimistic, or simply better ways of living. This course tracks both sides of this dialectic historically and theoretically, in the hope of better understanding our contemporary entanglements in toxic media environments and cultures. To that end, we will pay particular attention to the recent burst of critical (and not-so-critical) writing about social media and internet use. Throughout, our focus will be less on the theoretical agendas of media critics than on the way theory can inform our sense of practical problems and prospects for better living; our reading will range across scholarly, popintellectual, and journalistic work. Our reading will be bookended by Theodor Adornoʼs 1951 Minima Moralia: Reflections from Damaged Life and James Bridleʼs 2018 New Dark Age. Screenings and aesthetic texts will range widely across media and genres, including films, video art, literature, internet art, conceptual art, and video games.

Day and time: Tuesday 14:00-18:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: This seminar will take place in person.

Instructor: Scott Richmond

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, and CIN301Y1. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Hip-hop is a vast cultural aesthetic; as a result, establishing clear boundaries around the genres has been a challenge for fans and scholars. Defining hip-hop only gets harder when we consider a broader range of objects—hip-hop architecture, fine art, hair, etc. This course explores hip-hop aesthetics on screen, tracing the culture’s shift across our audio-visual landscape and its movement from the margins to the mainstream. Through close attention to form in contemporary hip-hop visual culture (cinema, fashion, dance, music videos, album art, etc.), we will try to understand how hip-hop’s expansion over the last five decades has confronted the cultural logics that shape race, gender, sexuality, labor, and technology. Our primary objective is to identify sophisticated research questions—using tools from Sound Studies, Black Studies, Queer Theory, and Performance Studies—that respond to hip-hop’s theorization of culture and aesthetics.

Day and time: Monday 16:00-18:00, Thursday 13:00-15:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: This seminar will take place in person.

Instructor:  Lauren Cramer

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, and CIN301Y1. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Inspired by Derek Walcott’s phrase “the sea is history,” this 400-level seminar will critically explore the visual and material modalities that constitute an oceanic imaginary. Studying visualization of the sea’s watery depths, our inquiry will bring the oceanic as an analytic into prominence. The focus will be on the Atlantic shaped by the forces of imperial conquest and the exchange of commodities, slaves, peoples and ideas. While maritime life worlds and beasts from Leviathan to Moby Dick have served as generative metaphors for political imagination, this seminar will consider the political-theoretical themes of empire, slavery, migration and the biosphere through the distinctive spatial lens of the sea. Interdisciplinary inquiry –from philosophy, literary studies, postcolonial studies, black geographies, oceanography, ecocriticism to posthumanist feminist phenomenology ¬ – will aid in the study of moving image works that foreground reciprocal relationships between marine environments and the human. Discourses that inform the “blue humanities” will be read in tandem with an array of feature films, documentaries and artists’ moving image installation works. Lastly, this seminar offers the opportunity to “think with water” as a means to formulate novel approaches to aquatic “spacetime mattering” (Barard) beyond Sigmund Freud’s notion of “oceanic feeling.” Authors include: Paul Gilroy, Catherine Hall, Ndei Okorafor, Luce Irigaray, Z.I. Jackson, Karen Barard, Saidya Hartman, Elizabeth Povinelli, Donna Haraway, Olaudah Equiano, Rachel Carson, Marcus Rediker, Édouard Glissant, Edward Braithwaite, Ian Baucom, Dionne Brand, among others.

Day and time: Tuesday 10:00-14:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: This seminar will take place in person.

Instructor: Kass Banning

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, and CIN301Y1. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Group D: Theory and Criticism

Course description to come.

Day and time: Tuessday 15:00-18:00 - Please note that students must sign up for a Tutorial. When the 2021/22 Timetable is released, please see Faculty of Arts & Science Timetable for Tutorial days and times.

Delivery Method: Lecture is In Person, Tutorial is Online Synchronous

Delivery Instructions: Lectures and screenings will be take place in person and tutorials will be take place online synchronously per the meeting schedule. It is recommended that students have a computer with a microphone and camera in order to participate in online activities.

Instructor: To be announced. 

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Course description to come.

Day and time: Monday 13:00-15:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instruction: Lectures will take place in person. Screenings will be online asynchronous. It is recommended that students have a computer with internet access for the online screenings.

Instructor: To be announced. 

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1

Exclusion: INI374H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Course description to come.

Day and time: Thursday 11:00-15:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: Lecture and screenings will take place in person.

Instructor: Guy Maddin

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

In-depth history of humanistic theories of media and mediation, with a focus on aesthetics. Authors discussed may include Karl Marx, Walter Benjamin, Sigmund Freud, Marshall McLuhan, Friedrich Kittler, Donna Haraway, Bernard Stiegler, Katherine Hayles, and others. Includes substantial discussion of contemporary problems and authors in digital media studies and media theory. Includes extensive consideration of aesthetic forms, including animation, cinema, television, installation art, video games, net.art, and others.

Day and time: Monday 11:00-15:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: Lectures and screenings will take place in person.

Instructor: Scott Richmond

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1

Recommended Preparation: CIN214H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Course description to come.

Day and time: Thursday 11:00-13:00, Friday 11:00-13:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: Lecture and screenings will take place in person.

Instructor: To be announced.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1 and one additional Cinema Studies full-course equivalent. An application form must be submitted.

Exclusion: INI384H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

In the Western imagination, cultural difference (race, class, gender, etc.) is rendered through the organization of space. Geographies, real or imagined, provide the grounds for exploration, segregation, and domination. In this course, we will explore the politics of space and the built environment in a wide range of images across film, television, and digital media. Using a collection of interdisciplinary texts, we will address cultural spaces like “the sunken place,” (Get Out), the banlieue, and “the East.” The course will be divided into three units: first, we will explore the formal and historical resonance between cinema and architecture; second, we will look at specific architectural techniques that appear in both the built environment and in cinema that shape the way we understand space, bodies, information, time, and culture; finally, we will explore spatial interventions in visual culture, formal manipulations of space, that use images to reimagine the world and our place in it.

Day and time: Thursday 10:00-12:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: This seminar will take place in person. Screenings will be online asynchronous. It is recommended that students have a computer with internet access for the screenings.

Instructor: Lauren Cramer

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, and CIN301Y1. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Course description to come.

Day and time: Wednesday 10:00-12:00, Friday 10:00-12:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: The seminar and screenings take place in person.

Instructor: To be announced.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, and CIN301Y1. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Group E: History and Nation

The topic of this course proposes expanded documentary inquiry in two directions. First, the course will exceed established categorization of Canadian documentary, to include, for example, Québec’s cinéma direct or expository modes that betray a strictly governmental apparatus. Theorizing documentary as an aesthetic, cultural and political practice in a more capacious register, the aim is to consider documentary’s digital present in extended forms and practices, from 70’s video art, to the essay film, to contemporary artists’ film, to interactive and transmedia documentaries, to VR, to animation, to installation art, and beyond. Our formative question is: What defines expanded documentary within and after critiques of Canadian settler colonialism? Additionally, why have “official” definitions proved mutable and even contentious over the years in Canadian documentary studies? Looking beyond customary definitions of non-fiction, the course aims to provide an expanded perspective on the real in Canadian moving image culture.

The second implication of expanded lies with the course’s objects of study. Looking beyond the canon, recent Indigenous, “minor” and queer media will be foregrounded, paying special attention to formal, aesthetic politico-ethical questions. Critical methodologies for situating expanded documentary as a uniquely Canadian screen practice will be highlighted, with burgeoning intersectional approaches to critical race and Indigenous/Black/Brown theory – to include critiques of multiculturalism and explorations into Indigenous futurism, with both video collectives and trans-national collaborations– guiding our study.

Filmmakers/artists include: Kent Monkman, Rebecca Belmore, Brett Story, Thirza Cuthand, Mina Shum, Charles Officer, Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, Lisa Jackson, Abdi Osman, Peter Mettler, Dionne Brand, ISUMA and ARNAIT Video Productions, Stan Douglas, Winston Washington Moxam, John Greyson, William Grieves, Alanis Obomsawin, among others.

Day and time: Tuesday 10:00-12:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instruction: Lectures will take place in person. Screenings will be online asynchronous. It is recommended that students have a computer with internet access for the online screenings.

Instructor: Kass Banning

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1

Exclusion: FCS391H1, INI385Y1, INI385H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Major contemporary developments beyond Hollywood and European filmmaking, examining a select number of national/regional cinemas: Africa, Korea, Iran, India (Hindi cinema), and Latin America. Topics include: transnationalism, indigenization of generic and stylistic conventions, cultural contexts, distribution networks, film festivals, and reception within a global economy.

Day and time: 

  • Fall 2021: Tuesday 16:00-18:00
  • Winter 2022: Monday 15:00-18:00, Tuesday 16:00-18:00

Delivery Method: 

  • Fall 2021: Lecture is In Person, Screening is Online Asynchronous
  • Winter 2022: Lecture and Screening are In Person

Delivery Instructions: In the Fall 2021 term, lectures will take place on Tuesdays 4-6pm in person while screenings will be online asynchronous. In the Winter 2022 term, lectures will remain the same, but screenings will switch to in person on Mondays 3-6pm. It is recommended that students have a computer with internet access for the online screenings.

Instructor: To be announced.

Exclusion: INI380Y1

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1

Recommended Preparation: CIN201Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 3. Society and its Institutions

In-depth treatment of a national cinema. More information to come.

Day and time: Wednesday 10:00-12:00, Friday 10:00-12:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: Lectures and screenings will take place in person.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Course description to come.

Day and time: Tuesday 10:00-12:00, Thursday 13:00-15:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: Lecture and screenings will take place in person. 

Instructor: To be announced.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Course description to come.

Day and time: Wednesday 10:00-12:00

Delivery Method: In Person

Delivery Instructions: Seminar will take place in person. Screenings are online asynchronous. It is recommended that students have a computer with internet access for the online screenings.

Instructor: To be announced.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, and CIN301Y1. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Group F: Independent Studies

Independent research projects devised by students and supervised by Cinema Studies faculty. Open to advanced Specialist and Major students in the Cinema Studies Program. Submit applications to the Undergraduate Program Office: Fall 2021 courses by May 1, 2021, Winter 2022 courses by November 1, 2021, Summer 2022 courses by April 1, 2022. See Undergraduate Forms for the application form. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Independent research projects devised by students and supervised by Cinema Studies faculty. Open to advanced Specialist and Major students in the Cinema Studies Program. Submit applications to the Undergraduate Program Office: Fall 2021 courses by May 1, 2021, Winter 2022 courses by November 1, 2021, Summer 2022 courses by April 1, 2022. See Undergraduate Forms for application form. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Delivery Method: Online - Asynchronous

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Independent research projects devised by students and supervised by Cinema Studies faculty. Open to advanced Specialist and Major students in the Cinema Studies Program. Submit applications to the Undergraduate Program Office: Fall 2021 courses by May 1, 2021, Winter 2022 courses by November 1, 2021, Summer 2022 courses by April 1, 2022. See Undergraduate Forms for application form. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Delivery Method: Online - Asynchronous

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

Group G: Cross-Listed

To be announced.